Posts Tagged ‘Coral Springs bed bug control’

Florida Do It Yourself Pest Control Store

May 23, 2011

At our Melbourne pest control and lawn services store, not only can you get professional products, but you can also get advice from our professionally trained technicians. They will give you information like how, what, where, and why to apply different products for different pests.

Florida DO It Yourself Pest Termite Control & Lawn Care

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Florida Pest Termite & Lawn Services

February 25, 2011

AL Hoffer’s Pest Termite & Lawn has been serving South Florida since 1975! We have been providing superior Florida lawn care, Florida pest control, Florida termite control, and Pest inspections for over 30 years!  Now you can follow Al Hoffer’s on Facebook, Twitter, Buzz, and other social media sites for your entire pest, termite, and lawn care needs! Also be sure to subscribe to our RSS feed while you’re here. We thank you for visiting our blog and encourage you to come back real soon!

Bedbugs and your health

December 21, 2010

Are Bedbugs a Health Threat?

The old adage “sleep tight and don’t let the bedbugs bite” is taking on new meaning this summer as bedbug infestations are on the rise, from Iowa to Seattle, Minnesota to New York City, CBS Early Morning News reports.

In fact, infestations are becoming so common that exterminators can barely keep up: Calls about bedbugs are up 71 percent, from one or two calls a year to 10 to 50 per week since 2001, says Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for the National Pest Management Association. Health officials in Manchester, N.H., even started a Bedbug Action Committee tasked with bringing the issue under control.

Infestations are on the rise, experts say, because bedbugs hitch a ride on our clothes and hang out in our beds. And they are not only found in homes; more and more bedbugs are showing up in hotels, dormitories and places where people frequently travel. Even retailers are not immune: Victoria’s Secret in New York City closed its doors for several hours to exterminate the nasty critters.

Bedbugs are many things, but one thing they are not, is a threat to your health. They are not disease vectors and are not considered a public health risk, according to entomologists at Purdue University’s Public Health and Medical Entomology department. But their bites do tend to leave itchy welts on human skin, and some people experience an allergic reaction. What’s more, bedbug sufferers say these persistent creatures wreak havoc on the psyche.

“Besides the ‘icky’ feeling of knowing bugs have crawled over you in your sleep, even after the infestation has been dealt with, people may still have a fear of falling asleep and feel anxiety about the whole experience,” says Henriksen. “In some cases, furniture [and] clothes have had to be thrown away, increasing the costly toll of the problem.”

Bedbugs are typically most active at night and tend to bite exposed skin while people are sleeping. The face, neck, hands and arms are the most common sites. Typically, the bites produce redness, swelling and itching, but if scratched, they can become infected, which is the most bodily damage they can cause. A particularity of bedbug bites is that they show up as multiples in a row.

Entomologists say the bugs’ presence has nothing to do with cleanliness, but the insects do produce small brown or red dots on sheets. And getting rid of them is not easy or cheap.

How do you spot a bedbug? Adult bedbugs are about 1/4-inch long, oval, reddish brown and wingless. Their bodies are very flat, and they possess long, slender legs and antennae, according to the Purdue scientists.

Bedbugs can travel easily — from beds to sofa cushions, from room to room and even home via suitcases from travel. Once an infestation develops, whether in a home, a hotel or even a movie theater, bedbugs are extremely difficult to remove and require the experience of a pest professional. Bedbugs can live for a year or more without eating and can withstand a wide range of temperatures, from nearly freezing to almost 113 degrees Fahrenheit, says Henriksen.

And since it is the height of travel season (the resurgence of bedbugs is tied largely to international travel), it is important for travelers to know what to look for in hotels. The NPMA offers these tips:

* Pull back the hotel bed sheets and inspect the mattress seams, particularly the corners, for telltale brownish or reddish spots.
* Thoroughly inspect the entire room before unpacking. Do not put your luggage on the bed.
* If you change rooms but choose to stay in the same establishment, be sure your new room is not adjacent to the potentially infested room.
* Use a large plastic bag to store your luggage.

Florida Bed Bug Control

Treating bedbugs isn’t a do-it-yourself project

December 20, 2010

Sarasota Herald-Tribune: Treating bedbugs isn’t a do-it-yourself project

12/18/2010
By Kate Spinner

If dreaded bedbugs invade, don’t make a run for the store pesticide aisle.

Bedbugs have developed resistance to almost half of the 300 pesticides listed for their control. And even the pesticides that do work can make infestations harder to beat if they are not applied correctly.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Centers for Disease Control, Florida’s surgeon general and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services recently issued public warnings urging people not to tackle bedbug problems on their own.

Rampant misuse of pesticides in Ohio, New Jersey and New York, where bedbug infestations are skyrocketing, has led to home explosions and illnesses from over-exposure to toxic chemicals.

“What we’re trying to do is make sure Florida is aware of those kinds of issues so that people don’t do things that are harmful to themselves,” says Michael Page, chief of the Bureau of Entomology for the FDACS.

Instead, they advise working with a pest control company with a strategy to eradicate the bugs.

“This pest is not like roaches or flies or fleas, where you can treat once or twice and the problem is gone,” Page says.

Largely absent from public dialogue four years ago, bedbugs have become a common pest problem throughout the United States. International travel and the bug’s ability to swiftly build resistance to even the toughest pesticides, including banned DDT, has allowed the irritating bugs to spread rapidly.

In desperation, homeowners dangerously are setting off multiple bug bombs in their homes or buying outdoor pesticides on the Internet to spray in their bedrooms.

“Typically, in the consumer world, if one is good, two is better and five is really good,” says Wayne Walker, senior pest control technician at the University of Florida Department of Housing and Residence Education. “They don’t understand the ramifications of over-applying the pesticide.”

The problem has become so immense that Congress has held forums to develop a national bedbug strategy and last year considered passing a bill — the Don’t Let the Bedbugs Bite Act — to fund state inspection of hotels.

People are downright terrified of bedbugs because of the high cost, the difficulty of treatment and the social stigma. According to a recent survey funded by a major pesticide company, 30 percent of people say they would rather have a root canal than find bedbugs at home. Bedbugs, though icky and annoying, are not known to transmit disease to humans.

Improper use of pesticides can be much worse than a bedbug’s bite. Instead of trying to manage infestations alone, which rarely works, people should hire outside help, says Fred Santana, entomologist with the Sarasota County Extension Agency.

It is important, however, to make sure the professionals know what they are doing. Santana says experienced companies will use an integrated approach, combining methods such as heat treatments, fumigation and strategically placed powders.

People should interview three to four companies before settling on one. Ask to see licenses and ask questions about their experience, strategies and pesticide choices.

In other states, unscrupulous or unlicensed companies have put clients at risk by over-using pesticides or using outdoor products indoors, exposing people to chemicals that can cause nerve damage and cancer.

“If there’s a least-toxic approach, try the least toxic first,” Santana says.

Heat has proven to be one of the best controls. Professionals place special fans or heaters in a room to bring temperatures to at least 113 degrees, hot enough to kill all stages of bedbugs, from adults the size of apple seeds to their nearly invisible eggs.

Most companies inspect for free and provide an estimate, which usually ranges from $500 to $1,500, depending on the size of the house and the level of infestation.

People will need to work with their pest company and follow instructions that range from throwing clothes and sheets in the dryer to packing items in plastic. They also should be prepared to live with the problem for several weeks before the bugs are successfully eliminated, says Cindy Mannes, spokeswoman for Arrow and Hughes exterminators.

“Pest control may have to come back three, four, five times, depending on the infestation,” Mannes says. “It can be controlled; it’s just not an easy process.”

Bedbugs are extraordinarily tough to control and a lot of over-the-counter applications can make problems worse. Many products claim effectiveness, but have only been tested in lab situations.

“It leads the consumer into false beliefs that it will do things that it may not do,” Walker says.

Bedbugs are so hard to control because they hide easily in small crevices, develop chemical resistance quickly, their population can explode exponentially in months and they can go long periods without food.

Foggers often make bedbugs disappear from sight, but the insects escape the poison by moving to other rooms or taking refuge behind light switches, picture frames or baseboards. They can travel 15 to 20 feet to feed, so a new hiding spot will not keep them from their sleeping prey. Repellant sprays, such as those containing pyrethrins, have the same scattering effect that in the end makes the problem harder to combat.

Contact sprays can work, but only on those that actually get sprayed. Also, it is not guaranteed that all bugs that come in contact with the spray will actually die. When insects survive a dousing, they produce resistant offspring.

A female bedbug lives six months to a year and lays an average of 500 eggs, at a rate of three to five per day. Eggs hatch in 10 days, with the young reaching sexual maturity 30 to 45 days later.

“They develop resistance really fast because their life-cycle is really fast,” Walker says.

Further, a female only mates once and afterward moves several feet away from her original colony.

It only takes one fertilized female to start a full-blown infestation. And that single bug can live for more than six months on just one meal.

“It’s a challenge for the pest management industry and if you know it’s a challenge for us, what does the homeowner do when he gets ahold of the pesticides?” Walker says.

People resort to extreme measures to eradicate bedbugs because it is a frustrating and demoralizing experience, Walker says.

For many people, the bed is a safety zone, the place where they hid from lightning storms as children.

“Here is an insect that invades that safety zone and feeds on you at night while you sleep,” Walker says. “People do some really drastic things to deal with this issue.”

Part of the problem is the high cost of treatment. Many people, including minimum-wage hotel and motel workers who are most at risk, cannot afford to pay $500 to $1,500 to get rid of their pests. They either live with the problem and spread it, or try, usually unsuccessfully, to control it themselves. When homeowners do not have the financial means to hire pest control, they should at least consult an bug expert with the county extension service for advice before attacking the problem on their own.

“The solution is they’ve got to find some cost-effective method of dealing with this insect,” Walker says. “Right now there’s not a cost-effective method that’s available to the general public that is also effective on the bedbugs.”

Florida Bed Bug Control Services

Bed bug tips for travelers

December 10, 2010

The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) advises travelers to take some simple precautions to avoid the most unwanted holiday present — an encounter with bed bugs.

Here are tips for travelers from NPMA:

•Thoroughly inspect the entire room before unpacking. Don’t put luggage on the bed.
•Pull back bed sheets and inspect mattress seams, particularly the corners, for telltale brownish or reddish spots. Bed bugs can also be found in box springs and behind baseboards, electrical switch plates, picture frames, wallpaper, in upholstery and furniture.
•If changing rooms within the same hotel, ensure the new room is not adjacent to the possibly infested room.
•If staying at a residence, inform the homeowner immediately of a suspected bed bug problem.
•Use a large plastic bag to store luggage.
•Upon returning home, inspect and vacuum suitcases before bringing them into the house.
•Wash all clothes — whether worn or not — in hot water or take them to a dry cleaner.
•If you suspect an infestation in your own home, contact a licensed pest professional to inspect the property.

Bed bugs infestation force out USF student

November 30, 2010

Campus Lodge Apartments; Bed bugs infestation force out USF student

Spring Hill, FL – “I thought it was because of stress because its finals week and because I work full time,” said Michael Bennett, 21, who says it took him a week to realize what was causing the welts all over his body.

Around 3:00am Tuesday morning, Bennett made the disgusting discovery.

“I turn on my light and I see a bug crawling on me so I instantly take it off, put it down and I look over and I had another one on my arm. So, I take them off and I got kind of nervous because I’ve never seen this kind of bug before. I’ve been in Florida my whole life,” said Bennett.

He got on the computer and made a match: bed bugs.

“I looked between the mattress and the box spring and that’s when I saw a big line of them. I had a couple scurry off and that’s when I flipped out, just ran out of my room,” said Bennett.

Management with the Campus Lodge Apartments in Lutz says they have had “only four cases” of bed bugs this year.

Tim Hanson with corporate management out of Texas told 10 News on Wednesday they had an exterminator in the apartment within 24 hours to start the chemical process. Hanson says they are replacing Bennett’s bed and giving him two options: he can immediately move into a different apartment on the property; or if he doesn’t want to come back, they will advertise the open room but Bennett will have to pay rent until they find someone.

“I don’t feel that is a fair option. They aren’t paying for any of my clothes to be washed, not paying for any of my doctor bills, not paying for my time off and who knows how this is going to affect my finals exam week. they’re not even caring about that,” said Bennett.

Now, at his parents‘ house in Hernando county, Bennett’s mother Sharon agrees, “You don’t pay rent for somewhere you can’t live.”

She will accept nothing less than lease termination without fees. “All I’m really wanting is a termination of the lease. I want him out.”

Meanwhile, all Bennett wants is to study, work and sleep in conditions much cleaner than waht he woke up to on Tuesday.

Since it is the Thanksgiving holiday, apartment management told the Bennett family the issue will not be resolved until next week.

BED BUG TIPS: If you are traveling this holiday weekend, inspect your room for the small, tick-like insects. If you find any bed bugs, ask to move to a room with no history of the creatures and make sure it is nowhere near the infested room. Keep your bags off the floor and bedding because bed bugs live in the upholstery and carpet. Plus, before you come home, spray your bags with an EPA-approved over-the-counter chemical that kills biting bugs and their eggs.

South Florida bed bug control company

 

Florida Bed Bug Control Company ~Ask the Experts~

June 1, 2010

What do bedbugs look like?

They are brown, about a quarter of an inch in diameter, and look like an apple seed or a lentil.

Has there really been a resurgence in bedbugs in the U.S. and how do you know?

There HAS been an increase in bedbug infestations.  Pest control companies who received 1 or 2 bedbug calls a year are now reporting 1 to 2 each week. According to research conducted by the National Pest Management Association bedbug reports have increased 71% from 2000 to 2005.

Where have you been finding the bedbugs?

These pests are not limited to any one specific type of dwelling.  Pest control companies have been reporting the infestations in multi-family housing, apartments, hotels and even hospitals.

What states have been affected?

Pest control companies have reported bed bug activity on a national scale.  Bedbugs are being found from the East to the West Coast; and everywhere in between. Every state has reported bedbug infestations.

Why are bedbugs so hard to treat?

Bedbugs should NOT be equated with filth or sanitation problems — in hotels or in homes, for that matter. Bedbugs are VERY elusive, transient and nocturnal pests. They are often found in other areas besides the bed, and they are hardy.  They can live for a year or more without eating and can withstand a wide range of temperatures from nearly freezing to almost 113 degrees Fahrenheit.

Bedbugs CAN be controlled with vigilance, constant inspection and treatment by professional pest control companies.

What can a consumer do to protect themselves from bedbug infestations?

To prevent bedbug infestations, consumers need to be vigilant in assessing their surroundings. When returning from a trip, check your luggage and clothing.  If you think you may have a bedbug infestation, contact a pest control professional.  This is not a pest that can be controlled with do-it-yourself measures.

Why are bedbugs an issue for hotels, visitors, and homeowners?

Bedbugs leave itchy, bloody welts on human skin.  Adult bedbugs can live for a year without eating, making them especially hard to control.  Once inside a hotel or home, bedbugs spread rapidly from room to room – through pipes, in vacuum cleaners, on clothing and luggage.  In a hotel, bedbugs can even spread to neighboring rooms, since guests are may end up moving to another room.

Are bedbugs just in beds?

Bedbugs are not just in beds.  They can be in chair cushions, sofas, behind electrical outlets, cracks and crevices around baseboards, or even behind picture frames.  In other words, they can live pretty much anywhere.

How does one control bedbugs?

Any effective bedbug control strategy should start with a careful, thorough inspection by a pest control professional of all known and suspected spots where the bugs may be harboring.  This is not a pest that can be controlled effectively with do-it-yourself measures.  As they are discovered, the pest control professional will develop a treatment and control strategy with the customer depending on the extent of the infestation.

South Florida Bed Bug Control Company

Do you have bed bugs?

April 16, 2010

South Florida Bed Bug Control Company