Posts Tagged ‘Stuart’

Florida Do It Yourself Pest Control Store

May 23, 2011

At our Melbourne pest control and lawn services store, not only can you get professional products, but you can also get advice from our professionally trained technicians. They will give you information like how, what, where, and why to apply different products for different pests.

Florida DO It Yourself Pest Termite Control & Lawn Care

Freeze won’t kill chinch bugs

February 7, 2011

Freeze won’t kill chinch bugs

By Tom MacCubbin

Q: How much cold weather is required to kill chinch bugs? I heard South Florida residents have to treat all year long?

A: It’s wishful thinking to expect the cold to control most lawn pests including the chinch bugs. South Florida residents may have to stay alert for these pests year-round but residents of Central Florida and northward normally get a break during a cold winter.

Chinch bugs activity is greatly reduced during the cooler weather and controls are seldom needed until spring. They do survive even the freezes and can be expected to start feeding in local lawn around the middle of March. As soon as the consistently warm weather arrives it would be a good time to apply an insecticide treatment if these pests are a persistent problem in your lawn.

Q: I purchased tree seedlings during Florida Arbor Day and I would like to grow them in large containers as I am not ready to plant them in the ground. What kind of soil mixture should I use?

A: Select a good potting mix found at your local garden center. This mixture should be free of weeds, insects, nematodes and similar pests that might affect the young trees. A good potting mixture should be loose and well-drained to give trees the best growing conditions. Many also have up to a 3-month supply of nutrients to help encourage new growth.

Ryegrass cannot take Florida’s heat

Q: Can ryegrass be grown in the winter, spring and summer? Is it a hardy grass?

A: Ryegrass flourishes during the winter weather but it cannot take Florida’s heat. Lawns seeded during the cooler months are still green and may need frequent mowings even after the recent frosts and freezes. It seems like a miracle grass until around mid March when the heat returns and ryegrass begins to decline. Most temporary ryegrass lawns are sown between November and February.

Is it safe to prune dead stems, leaves?

Q: Frosts and freezes have shriveled the hibiscus, bougainvillea and other plants in my yard. In the past I have waited to do the pruning until new growth started but I would damage or remove these at the same time. Can I trim off the dead portions now?

A: Some may argue that brown stems and leaves give plants protection from future cold but it’s hard to believe those few shrived portions are of much benefit. As you noted, more plant damage to the new shoots might be done if you wait until the warmer weather returns. Most gardeners are busy trimming off the brown and reshaping their plants at this time. You probably should too.

Bed Bug Registry

February 3, 2011

Be sure you check out the Bed Bug Registry before booking your next vacation. http://www.bedbugregistry.com allows users to get online and post bedbug sightings on the web in order to alert others as to where bed bug infestations are. A great tool for any traveler.

http://bedbugregistry.com/location/FL/

Lodgings in Broward, Central Florida lead state in 2010 bedbug violations

January 27, 2011

Lodgings in Broward, Central Florida lead state in 2010 bedbug violations

For the Gipson family of Harvey, La., last summer’s trip to the Liki Tiki Village condo resort in Winter Garden is one that they will never forget.

“Pretty much all of them went to the doctor and got creams,” Archie Gipson said about eight of his dozen relatives, including a 9-month-old baby, who vacationed together and who, he said, were bitten by bedbugs. “No one got fever, but the bites were kind of severe.”

Bedbugs are persistent parasites that have likely been around as long as the human hosts from whom they suck blood. Since 2000, there has been a resurgence of bedbugs around the world. The bugs’ resistance to pesticides, international travel and the growth in human population all have been blamed.
But no expert can pinpoint the reason for the parasites’ defiant prominence.

They prompt headlines when they bite people in movie theaters and clothing stores or hitchhike in children’s backpacks.

In 2010, inspectors from the Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation found bedbugs in 68 accommodations, accounting for just 0.18 percent of 36,947 licensed hotels, motels, apartments and condos, an agency spokeswoman said.

In 2009, when there were slightly fewer lodgings, 30 establishments, or 0.08 percent of 36,866 licensed facilities, had bedbug violations.

People, who can carry the bugs in their clothing, laptop computers and luggage, brought them to Florida counties with the most popular destinations: Broward (with 13 establishments cited) and Orange County (10 accommodations with bedbug violations) led the state with confirmed parasite infestations.

And no lodging, whether fancy, family-friendly or budget, is immune from the scourge.

In New York City, even the Waldorf- Astoria on Park Avenue has been stricken by bedbug infestations and is reportedly being sued by customers who claim to have been bitten by the parasites.

The glamorous landmark has hosted President Barack Obama, as well as other heads of state, royalty and celebrities. A spokesman for Hilton Worldwide, which owns the Waldorf-Astoria, said that for hotel management, “the safety and comfort of our guests are our top priority” and that the hotel “maintains high levels of vigilance and performs regularly scheduled inspections.”

“If the Waldorf can get ’em, anybody can get ’em,” said Allen Fugler, executive vice president of the Florida Pest Management Association. “Bedbugs are not respecters of property or prestige. They are equal-opportunity offenders.”

While Broward leads the state in bedbug violations, Nicki E. Grossman, president of the Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention & Visitors Bureau, said of the county’s approximately 565 hospitality business owners: “Unfortunately, any location that hosts world travelers is susceptible. Broward hoteliers, many of which carry the top flags in the hospitality industry, are aware of the global issue and are diligent in their operating procedures to maintain the highest standards of cleanliness and fix any problems that might arise.”

The global issue is fueling “a steady number of calls for support,” Fugler said of the growth industry for the pesticide control group’s 800 members.

“It’s good, steady business, at a higher level than two years ago,” he said. Those were the days when the state’s exterminators did not even report doing bedbug work, Fugler says. “Now there is a segment of the industry dedicated to it.”

Specialists use tactics like bedbug-sniffing dogs and heat treatments for building interiors to bake the bugs to death.

Fugler thinks international travel is the most probable cause, considering that Broward and Orange counties attract tourists from around the world.

“Aircraft containers are likely prospects, with luggage adjacent to each other in dark holds for a long time,” Fugler said. “Because aircraft are not kept on the ground for long, with luggage holds there are not large opportunities to do treatment, and holds are not the most frequently thought of places to treat. More often, experts are treating the galley for cockroaches because of food and beverage service.”

Though travelers rely on websites like bedbugregistry.com to see if hotel rooms and apartment buildings are infested, Fugler says, “those sites are consumer-driven, not monitored, not verified and information cannot be considered conclusive or authoritative.”

But such sites can give peace of mind, along with searching a hotel bed’s headboard, mattress seams and the 8-foot floor area surrounding it for the bugs, blood spots and fecal matter, as Fugler advises.

And if the telltale bites appear on your body, or the bugs scurry in your luggage or bedroom, experts advise you to forgo home remedies and use a licensed pest-management professional with experience in the identification and treatment of bedbugs.

That’s what community college instructor Archie Gipson did after his family’s long, itchy trip home to Louisiana.

“We had an exterminator come to two houses as a precaution,” Gipson said. “Total it all up, it was close to three or four grand, with the exterminators and doctors.”

He called last summer’s trip “a lost vacation.”

“It killed the whole spirit of the thing,” he said. “We were talking about that for weeks.”

He said that he asked Liki Tiki, which did not respond to the Sun Sentinel’s request for comment, to make amends.

“It’s a beautiful place. You wouldn’t expect that to happen because of all the staff they have on duty,” Gipson said. “Seems like housekeeping should have found it.”

He said he belongs to a time share, and that Liki Tiki was the family’s destination to enjoy Walt Disney World Resort or the Universal Orlando Resort every two years for the past 15 years. But Orange County won’t be the family’s 2012 destination.

“We would always go there, but I’m going to another [time share] instead near Daytona, because it’s brand new and will be near the beach,” Gipson said. “The kids don’t want to be bit no more.”

Florida Bed Bug Control

Bed Bug Registry

January 24, 2011

Be sure you check out the Bed Bug Registry before booking your next vacation. www.bedbugregistry.com allows users to get online and post bedbug sightings on the web in order to alert others as to where bed bug infestations are. A great tool for any traveler.

Florida Bed Bug Control Experts

Rat Crawls on Man in Subway

January 21, 2011

Rat Control

Melbourne, Vero Beach, Port Saint Lucie, Stuart, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Coral Springs, & Fort Lauderdale bedbug control tips

August 30, 2010

The EPA has listed the top ten bedbug control tips to take into account when you have bedbugs…take a look!

1. Make sure you really have bed bugs, not fleas or ticks or other insects.

You can verify your insect on our bed bug web page or check with your local extension agent.

2. Don’t panic.

Eliminating bed bugs is difficult, but it is not impossible. Don’t throw out all of your belongings; most of them can be treated and saved. Throwing out belongings is costly, may spread the infestation, and could be unnecessarily stressful.

3. Think through your treatment options — Don’t immediately reach for the spray can.

Be comprehensive in your approach. Integrated pest management techniques may reduce bed bug populations and limit pesticide exposure to you and your family. If pesticide treatment is needed, it is best to bring in a professional. There is help available to learn about integrated treatment options.

4. Reduce the number of hiding places — Clean up the clutter.

A cluttered home provides more places for bed bugs to hide and makes locating and treating for them more difficult. If bed bugs are in your mattress, using a mattress/box spring encasements makes it more difficult them to get to you while you sleep. To be effective they must be left in place for a year. Be sure to buy a product that has been tested for bed bugs and is strong enough to last for the full year without tearing.

5. Frequently wash and heat-dry your bed linens.

Wash bed spreads, and clothing that touches the floor to reduce bed bug populations. Bed bugs and their eggs can hide in laundry containers/hampers so clean them when you do the laundry.

6. Do-it-yourself freezing is not usually reliable for bed bug control.

While freezing can effectively kill bed bugs, temperatures must remain extremely low for an extended period of time. Home freezers typically are not cold enough to kill bed bugs. Freezing temperatures outside may be used to kill bed bugs, but can take several days (at 0oF) to almost a week (at 20oF).

7. High temperatures can kill bed bugs.

Raising the indoor temperature with the thermostat or space heaters won’t do the job, though. Space heaters must always be used with care, as they have the potential to cause fires and serious burns. Specialized equipment and very high temperatures are required to successfully heat treat a structure. Black plastic bags in the sun might work to kill bed bugs in luggage or small items, provided the contents become hot enough (approximately 110oF for at least 3 hours).

8. Don’t pass your bed bugs on to others.

Bed bugs are excellent hitchhikers. If you throw out a piece of furniture that is harboring bed bugs, take steps to destroy the item so that no one else adopts it (along with the bugs!).

9. Reduce populations to reduce bites.

Thorough vacuuming reduces populations. Carefully vacuum rugs, floors, under beds, around bed legs, bed frames, and all cracks and crevices around the room. Thoroughly vacuum upholstered furniture. Change the bag after each use so the bed bugs can’t escape. Place the used bag in a tightly sealed plastic bag and in an outside garbage bin. will reduce the populations.

10. Turn to the professionals, if needed.

Hiring an experienced, responsible pest control professional can increase the likelihood and the speed of success in eliminating bed bugs from your home. If you hire an expert, ensure it is company with a reputable history and ask them to use an IPM approach.) Contact your State pesticide Agency for guidance about hiring professional pest control companies.

Looking for bebdug control services in Melbourne, Vero Beach, Port Saint Lucie, Stuart, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Coral Springs or Fort Lauderdale?

Pest411 – How to Inspect your Hotel Room for Bed Bugs

June 9, 2010

PPMA contest winner

March 24, 2010

PPMA held its inaugural Pest PSA Contest through the PestWorldForKids.org Web site and received more than 50 entries nationwide. Students from Red Bank Middle School in New Jersey won the grand prize of $3,000 for their school’s science curriculum by demonstrating in a creative manner how important the messages of pest prevention and proper management are for consumers. Check out the winning video below!

South Florida Cockroach Exterminators

Termite Facts

February 16, 2010

Here are some general facts about termites, remember to call Al Hoffer’s Pest at the first sign of termite activity. We have been specializing in termite inspection and control in South Florida for over 30 years! Also check out the image below on how to distinguish an ant from a termite.

  • Termites are insects. They have hard, saw-toothed jaws that help them to eat lumber, wallpaper, plastics, and fabric made of plant fibers.
  • There are four different groups of termites: dampwood, drywood, subterranean and mound builders. Dampwood termites like to live and feed in very moist wood. Drywood termites can survive in very dry conditions and do not need moisture or soil. Subterranean termites are very common and live and breed in soil. Mound builders live in Africa, Australia, Southeast Asia and part of South America; they are able to build large earthen towers 25 feet or higher.
  • Termites can be found in almost every state as well as Mexico and parts of Canada. They favor warmer climates and actively avoid light. (See range map below)
  • As a species, termites date back to the time of the dinosaurs.
  • Termites are 24/7 bugs, which means they eat non-stop – 24 hours a day, seven days a week. They feed on wood and may also destroy paper products such as books, cardboard, boxes and anything containing cellulose. Even buildings with steel framing and masonry walls are targets because of the wooden door and window frames, cabinets and shelving within the buildings.
  • Termites live in underground colonies, some containing over two million members.
  • The social structure of a colony includes the queen, king, winged reproductive swarmers, soldiers, and workers. Worker termites are small creamy white insects. They are the most numerous and the cause of all the termite damage.
  • Swarmers, or winged reproductive’s, are termites that leave the colony to mate, reproduce and start new colonies.
  • In a large nest, a queen and king may live for 15 years, with the queen laying up to one egg every 15 seconds for most of her life.
  • Termites can cause serious damage to structures often long before they are discovered, i.e., more than $1.5 billion in property damage a year to over 600,000 homes in the United States.
  • How do termites enter the home? The most common termite, the subterranean, builds its nest in the ground. These termites construct mud tubes that are used to explore for food and connect their underground nest to that food source. They can enter a building without direct wood contact with the soil through such tubes. They can find their way into a structure through an opening as small as 1/32 of an inch (smaller than the size of a pinhead!).
  • Al Hoffer’s techs are termite control specialists, and can provide protection from termite infestations. Our termite inspectors are trained to locate specific areas in homes where a termite attack is most likely to occur. If termites are found, we can design a treatment plan to control current infestations and to protect homes from future infestations.

Image courtesy of American Pest Control